The Blog Roll

Featured

Modern blog formats allow me to make posts of diverse topics as I work on them, yet organize them according to subjects/categories.  The “blog roll” is the reverse chronological sequence of my postings, which may seem semi-random or disorganized to some– select a category to find the coherent themes. If you find them of interest, I invite you to “subscribe” and get an email note when I make a post. Don’t worry, I am not very prolific in this art, so there is no danger of flooding your inbox.

Ayres Natural Bridge Park

The Earth moves under the North Star while the moon illuminates the red rock canyon wall of Ayers Natural Bridges Park.

We were pleasantly surprised to discover this hidden gem in Wyoming, land donated from their ranch by the Ayres family.  The park was entirely free, including campsites, but no pets are allowed.  This is considered a benefit to some.

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10 July 2019
Ayres Natural Bridge Park, Douglas Wyoming
Canon 60Da with EOS EFS 10-22mm(@10mm)
Composited 5-minute exposures at f/5.6, ISO 200, 2-1/2 hours elapsed


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Astronomical League

Amateur astronomers from around the country gathered at the observing facilities of the Minnesota Astronomical Society on a warm July evening.  They discuss their observing plans for the night and  wait in eager anticipation as the brighter planets start to appear in the fading twilight.  

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13 July 2018
Eagle Lake Observatory at Baylor Regional Park,  Young America MN
Apple iPhone 7+
1/60 @ f/2.8, ISO 1250


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Minneapolis Moonrise

The moon rises over the cityscape of Minneapolis as its buildings start to turn on their own lighting..  This is the “supermoon”, a designation for when the moon is unusually close to Earth and hence, appears even larger than expected.

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Minneapolis MN
2 December 2017
Canon EOS 60Da, EF 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 70mm
1/60, f/2.8, ISO 400


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Icelandic Aurora

At 66 degrees north, Husavik Iceland is one degree away from the arctic circle.  This places it directly beneath the usual position of the auroral oval, that zone of active energized atmosphere that creates the northern lights.  The weather in Iceland is often overcast, but on this day the clouds cleared and the aurora were so brilliant they could be seen even over the lights of the city center and its active harbor.

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Husavik Iceland
21 September 2017
Canon EOS 60Da, EFS 10-22mm @ 12mm
2 sec, f/4, ISO 800


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The Diamond Ring

At the end of totality,  the moon starts to uncover the sun’s incredibly brilliant photosphere and creates a visual effect called the “diamond ring”.  It lasts only a moment, but leaves an remarkably strong emotional impression that may be responsible for why those that witness it, seek it again, at the next total eclipse of the sun.

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Heise Hot Springs, Idaho
21 August 2017
EOS 6D on Televue-85, 480 mm f/5.6


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Prominences

During the Great American Eclipse, the moon covered the brilliance of the sun’s photosphere, revealing the activity occurring at its surface.  Deep red flares of energized gas erupt and eject for thousands of miles, then follow the lines of magnetic force back to the surface.

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Heise Hot Springs, Idaho
21 August 2017
EOS 6D on Televue-85, 480 mm f/5.6


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Corona

Only when the moon covers the sun in a total eclipse can its halo be seen.  This is the corona, a mystery to astronomers, who only get a glimpse of it for a few minutes during totality.  The dot to the lower left is the star Regulus, in the constellation Leo, suddenly visible while the sun is eclipsed.

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Heise Hot Springs, Idaho
21 August 2017
EOS 6D on Televue-85, 480 mm f/5.6
HDR composite of 8 exposures


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Sunset at Mauna Kea

At the top of the tallest volcanic mountains on Hawaii are the world’s premier telescopes.  They are here because the air is calm and dry, high above the clouds and turbulence of lower elevations.  The tradeoff is cold and snow, a small price to pay for the chance to explore the secrets of the universe.

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Mauna Kea, Hawaii
3 January 2017
iPhone7+ panorama


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The Belt of Venus

The rosy glow of scattered twilight in the East is known as the “Belt of Venus”, which rides above the deep blue of Earth’s shadow on the sky.  Here it is witnessed from the vantage of Hawaii’s tallest peak, Mauna Kea, as the world’s premier telescopes prepare for another evening of peering into the universe.

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Mauna Kea, Hawaii
3 January 2017
iPhone7+ panorama


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